5 Peated Whiskies to Warm You Up This Christmas

#Tastes – 5 Peaty Whiskies sure to warm you up this Christmas

Christmas is just around the corner. What better way to spend Christmas with your loved ones,than by sharing a peaty dram or two with them. Warm up your chestnuts this festive season. Here are some of our favourite peated whiskies to try without breaking the bank.

The Bruichladdich Octomore 7.3

The Octomore 7.3 is the second release of Octomore whisky made from barley grown two miles along the coast from Bruichladdich’s distillery, at farmer and friend James Brown’s Octomore farm. Paying homage to the longtime camaraderie between both houses, the name “Octomore” was decidedly used to represent what would become the most heavily peated whisky series in the world. For those who haven’t had the Octomore before, tread with caution.

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The Bruichladdich Octomore 7.3

The Taste: One can obviously expect peat smoke, naturally, combined with the malty notes of barns, barley and straw. Expect tinges of tinned fruit, salted ham and marmalade. What’s interesting is the notes of salt-water (caused by the sea water splashed casks) which brings about a harmonious balance with apricots and honey.

The Lagavulin 12

The much adored Lagavulin 12 is certainly an acquired taste,  yet so revered by Lagavulin, that they have released one every year. With very subtle differences in each edition, including that of the phenol count and colour; be prepared for hit of peat that would knock your socks off.

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The Lagavulin 12years

The Taste:The Lagavulin 12 is starts off being dry and heavily peaty on the palate. You can expect notes of seaweed and botanicals which later melds pleasantly into sweetness and charcoal. The finish is that of dark chocolate which lingers for quite some time.

The Laphroaig 10

With dozens of awards to its name, The Laphroaig 10 is about as classic of an Islay as you can get. For those looking for a taste of something more refined yet chock full of the seductive taste of smoke, the Laphroaig 10 would perhaps be the whiskey to warm you up this Christmas.

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The Laphroaig 10 Years

The Taste:  The Laphroaig 10 begins with a traditional salty taste, tinged with sweet fruity hints. This is then followed by a growth in the thickness and body with layers of peat, smoke. To most people, they would almost call the Laphroaig medicinal.

The Peat Monster by Compass Box Whisky

The Peat Monster by Compass Box Whisky what you might call an artisan whisky. It is a  young whisky with a complexity that belies its age. The Peat Monster’s charm lies with its blend which helps to soften some of the raw peaty flavour which makes it’s a great starter for those wish to get into peated whiskies.

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The Peat Monster by Compass Box Whisky

The Taste:  The Peat Monster starts off sweet which later moves into delicious notes of smoky bacon and copper aroma. One can expect a long and powerful finish with floral notes of camomile, spice and oak.

The Ardbeg Non Chilled Filter 10 Years

Renowned for its smokey aroma and taste, the Ardbeg is a classic. It is non chill-filtered and one can expect a powerful punch when consuming The Ardbeg NCF 10 Years, does not simply throw its peat in your face, but rather gives way to the natural sweetness to balance out the peat.

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The Ardbeg 10 Years

Taste:One can expect a combination of smoke, tangy lemon and lime juice, fused with flavours of black pepper, cinnamon and toffee sweetness.

So there you have it, our 5 must-try peated whiskies for the end year event and lifestyle festivities. Have another to add? Let us know your favourites via our Facebook Page here.

Aaron Tan

Lifestyle Editor and Creative Director

A media professional with extensive experience in all forms of print and online media. Trained professionally in the film and television industry, Aaron Tan has also experience in features writing for magazines. A seasoned individual in creating viral content, Aaron is now a Creative Director and Partner with Com3 Singapore and Lifestyle Editor of Covered Asia

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